How Do You Use Current Events?

By Dawni Everett

Everyone wants their articles and blogs to be read. We all look for ways to improve our site visits and user interactions. I’ve read hundreds of articles on ways to increase traffic and most of it deals with finding ways to make your posts and website relevant. Search Engine Land recently published an article discussing the Link Apocalypse, obviously tying into the Mayan Apocalypse. Last year, even our own Web Editors Blog had several posts dealing with graduation in the month of May.

I’m sure you have all read the same articles as I have about using current events, however I was never able to get it to make sense to me. Most of the articles out there are for travel sites, or hotels, or restaurants. My company sells rubber stamps. How could I possibly use current events in anything I write to help increase our visibility?

About a month ago I finally read an article where someone explained it in such a way it finally clicked with me.

Follow in the moment trends and hot topics to inspire content ideas for your blog. For example, if you’re in the restaurant business, you could have monitored the web for relevant stories and possibly stumble upon the  great syrup robbery in Montreal. Once identifying this story as something you can leverage, a great way to generate traffic and potential press would be a blog post called: “10 Great Recipes for someone with $20Million worth of Syrup”. It’s a story that would be edgy, relevant and most importantly, a story worth sharing.

While it didn’t have anything to do with stamps, this time it showed how using something (the theft of $20 Million in Syrup) that has absolutely nothing to do with your business (restaurant) can be used and it provided an actual example (10 Great Recipes for someone with $20 Million worth of Syrup). This is a fun, tongue-in-cheek sort of way to use real time news and it is exactly the sort of thing I love.

It got me thinking about the different things we use stamps for and even some of the more outrageous stamps we’ve seen ordered here at work. I am currently working on an article for President’s Day that will introduce Where’s George (stamping dollar bills) with the title “Celebrate President’s Day with Dead Presidents” and I’m looking forward to publishing it.

Do you work in an industry where the “common” knowledge that everyone else talks about doesn’t seem to fit? Maybe the trick is learning to see it from a new perspective.

Personally, I cannot tell you how excited I am for the next celebrity divorce.  “The Top 10 Stamps (couple’s name here) Should Use on their Alimony Checks” will be published the very next day.

What are the best real-time news ideas you could you use with your business?

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About stampconnection

At Stamp-Connection we manufacture every self-inking stamp, pre-inked stamp, custom wood stamp, embosser, and engraving product in-house to provide faster service, and lower prices to our customers. Our veteran team has over 40 years of experience working with the latest technology to create crisp laser engraving die plates, and sharper photo polymer plates with less error, resulting in a better product than our competitors.

One thought on “How Do You Use Current Events?

  1. Hi Dawni, thanks for this post. In my case, I use current events a lot in my posts because I have a “green”, eco-friendly business, and the topic of climate change touches everything – from the impacts of super storm Sandy to how businesses can help transition to a greener economy. But I think the rubber stamp business has endless possibilities. In a sense, you create graphic “tweets” almost – a short message in graphic form, rather than over Twitter. They can be funny, inspirational, motivational, simple reminders, etc. and I suspect current events would be great fodder for new “messages” on an ongoing basis.

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