Redesign: Staging and Mapping Your Way to Success

By Cathy Hodson

You have a huge company website, and you have a matter of weeks to move content from your current site to your new site. How do you get a handle on how to move your content and figure out all the logistics involved? If your website has more than a hundred or so pages, or even thousands of pages, with all the associated documents and images, how do you get organized enough to know where your content is currently and how to get it to where it will be going on the new site?

By staging and mapping your content.

Staging your content
Staging is really prioritizing. What do you absolutely have to have on your new site when it launches? This is your first stage of content to be moved, before the launch, and the highest priority.

The second stage is the next level of content that – yes, it would be nice to have it on the site when you launch, but if it’s not, it will be the first content to go up after the launch.

The third stage is the final stage of content to be moved. Usually this consists of back issues of publications or content that could be considered “filling in” – background information, links to other resources, more of what you already have up, the finer details that fill in and embellish on what is already there.

What is mission-critical content? Mission critical defined: your business will suffer and your staff will have to scramble (in a bad way) to help your customers or members if this content is not on your website when you launch.

The actual timeline for all three stages depends on how quickly you need to have everything out of your current/old website. Usually all three stages should take about nine months to one year. To have all your content moved within six months of launch is a good benchmark.

Mapping your content
Once you have your content prioritized, you need to map it. Where does it reside on your site now? Where will it be moving to – most redesigned sites have also reorganized. So the content that might be listed under “Professional Development” on your current site might be split up among 2 or 3 different sections on your new site – Education, Continuing Education, Meetings. Somehow you have to note this for  someone who might not have detailed knowledge of your site (such as a temporary worker or consultant)  – where they would find the original content and where they need to put it on the new site.

The first website redesign I was a part of, the consultant that was building the website gave me a spreadsheet to use to map this process. It had columns for the new site location, the current site location, the status of the content (“testing,” “intro done”), a place for information about the content (such as “content needed” or “6 files, public side”), comments (“under construction” “is this the same as federal section on public side?”), and any changes (“name of section changed from X to Y”), and even a showing of which page(s) on the site link to each page or document listed. You can and should adjust the structure of your mapping document to whatever makes sense to you and your team. Is it better to list your content by the structure of the new site, or the structure from your current site? Up to you. Ask the people who will be moving the content which would make more sense to them? Or make an executive decision and decide for yourself which makes more sense.

Links
Something else that is helpful for content movers, especially if they are not part of your company’s staff, is to print out the pages on the current site, and mark up the page with notations for each of the links found on that page. Does this link go to a page on the same website (internal) or does it point to another company’s website (external site)? The internal site’s links may change, and that should  be noted – either on the page you printed or in the mapping document. If the page being linked to is from another department or division, and perhaps they have prioritized that page to be added at a different stage than when your page is going up, that should also be noted so the link can be added when the other department’s page goes up.

If it is an external site link – does it still work or does it need to be updated? If it no longer exists (or can’t be found), do you have instructions in place on what the content mover should do? Remove the link entirely, replace it with something else, or just leave it as is?

Once the plans for the staging and mapping have been completed, it gives you and your team parameters and guidelines for moving the content.

Content management systems
If you are keeping the same content management system, there may not be as much to do with mapping, prioritizing or moving content. It may be a matter of simply moving files across your system, adapting your content to a new page layout, or reclassifying the content. If you haven’t been using a content management system, but will be using one with the new website, you may pretty much have to reconstruct your pages – reformatting, linking to where new pages are, updating headline and other codes. You will have to do the same if you are changing content management systems.

Other considerations
Perhaps your URLs will change also. This is something that can be noted in the mapping document. A change of URL can be problematic – internally, for the sites that link to you, and for any links you publish on stationery or in publications – either those you print yourself or publications you submit materials to for articles or ads. Business cards may need to be updated, as well as signatures in email.

Any specialized domain names that point to deeper areas of your site may have to be repointed to the new location. For instance, our foundation has its own domain name, but it forwards to a deeper page within our association’s website. That location changed when we redesigned in 2011, and the DNS (domain name service) had to be updated to forward to the new location.

A successful redesign depends implicitly on how organized your team is, how much forethought and planning goes into the moving and launching processes, and nailing down the details. If you have never been part of a redesign before, choose your consultant carefully. You should hire a company that can walk you through the process and support you from both a development and an editorial standpoint. This is paramount to the success of the redesign. A redesign for a large website can take anywhere from one to three or four years, depending on how big your website is, what has to be done – a major overhaul of systems and the website, a simple reorganization and facelift, or anything in between.

Plan, prioritize and map. Iron out the details and make sure everyone understands what needs to be accomplished, when it needs to be accomplished by, and what the ramifications and consequences are if deadlines and project milestones are not met.

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